Natural Light

We noted earlier that the “natural light” is not the light of reason but the light of all things. What is here called “spiritual light” does not mean the light of the “soul” or the “spirit” in the ordinary sense of those words. It is rather a “samādhi of the Storehouse of the Great Light” out of which the light of all things (namely, the being itself of all things) is coming to our self in itself is the original and most elemental “middle,” we are pointing to nothing other than just this.

Nishitani Keiji, Religion and Nothingness

Believing in Nothing

I discovered that is is necessary, absolutely necessary, to believe in nothing. That is, we have to believe in something which has no form and no color— something which exists before all forms and colors appear. This is a very important point. No matter what god or doctrine you believe in, if you become attached to it, your belief will be based more or less on a self-centered idea. You strive for a perfect faith in order to save yourself. But it will take time to attain such a perfect faith. You will be incolved in an idealistic practice. In constantly seeking to actualize your ideal, you will have no time for composure. But if you are always prepared for accepting everything we see as something appearing from nothing, knowing that there is some reason why a phenomenal existence of such and such form and color appears, then at that moment you will have perfect composure.

-Shunryu Suzuki Zen Mind, Beginner’s Mind

Concerning Bashō

From Keiji Nishitani’s Religion and Nothingness:

He does not simply mean that we should ‘observe the pine tree carefully.’ Still less does he mean for us to ‘study the pine tree scientifically.’ He means for us to enter into the mode of being where the pine tree is the pine tree itself, and the bamboo is the bamboo itself, and from there to look at the pine tree and the bamboo.

(Nishitani, 1983, p. 128)